“6 Days, 50 Years: 1967 and the Politics of Time” at UC Berkeley

On the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the 1967 Middle East war, the Centers for Middle Eastern Studies at UC Berkeley, UCLA, and UC Santa Barbara will host contemporaneous panels to address this significant milestone through the meta narrative of “6 Days, 50 Years: 1967 and the Politics of Time.” UCLA will address how ’67 is remembered in visual and literary culture (the past) and UCSB how it plays out in current understandings on popular sovereignty (the present). At UC Berkeley, a panel of experts will reflect on how horizons of the future were differently produced after ’67 across different disciplines. … More “6 Days, 50 Years: 1967 and the Politics of Time” at UC Berkeley

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“Thinking Palestine: 1967 and Beyond” at UC Santa Barbara

Along with UCLA and UCB, UCSB is hosting a day of commemoration that will include a pane, a poster exhibit, and a reception. The panel seeks to build on decades of critical thinking and political organizing around Palestine and justice more broadly. It will engage how legality, legitimacy, and history have intersected over the last half a century.

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“1967: Nostalgia and Memory in the Middle East and Beyond” at UCLA

The Naksa—the widely-­‐used Arabic term for the “setback” suffered by Palestinians in the 1967 war—represented not only a defeat but also a turning point. While this turning-point had important political implications, its cultural ramifications and the explosion of creative expression it engendered also marked the Arab world indelibly. The proliferation of critical output produced by Arab thinkers and artists in its aftermath deserves to be at the center of academic inquiry as we observe this anniversary. Instead of focusing on political or legal repercussions, the conference panel will consider the relatively understudied impact of the Naksa in relation to Nostalgia and Memory, highlighting cultural production and institutional aspects of art.

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